Indian Country

Child Trauma Center

 

 

Indian Health Service
Webinar Series

Links to previous webinars...

Childhood Trauma in Indian Country

The ACE Study and AI/AN Children

 

 

 

 

Kognito
is a web based project that provides simulations to prepare people to lead real-life conversations that change lives by using interactive role-play to build skills.

To learn more about the

TF-CBT Therapist Certification Program

Use this link...

 

The Indian Country Child Trauma Center (ICCTC) was established to develop trauma-related treatment protocols, outreach materials, and service delivery guidelines specifically designed for American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) children and their families. The ICCTC was originally funded by the Substance Abuse Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA) in 2004 with the goal to develop and deliver training, technical assistance, program development, and resources on trauma informed care to tribal communities. It is housed at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center in the Center on Child Abuse and Neglect. The ICCTC has been awarded the Project Making Medicine grant from the Children's Bureau to provide training to clinicians in Indian Country in the Honoring Children, Mending the Circle curriculum, which is the cultural enhancement of Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy. ICCTC is also the grantee for the OJJDP Tribal Youth Training and Technical Assistance program.


 

Project Making Medicine Training
Training in Treatment of Child Physical and Sexual Abuse

Honoring Children, Mending the Circle
A cultural adaptation/enhancement of Trauma Focused Cognitive Behavioral Therapy (TF-CBT)

This project is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, 
Administration for Children, Youth and Families’ Children's Bureau

Training Dates for 2018

August 20, 21, 22, and 23, 2018

No Registration Fee to attend this training, however the online TF-CBT training is required and there is a $35 fee

Attend only one session red dot

red dot All completed applications must be received no later than 3 weeks prior to training

All applications must be submitted as a complete packet red dot

Participants are responsible for airfare and lodging expenses. Lodging is $139 per night plus taxes. Application must be received 3 weeks prior to training. If application is accepted later than 3 weeks prior to training, room rate increases to $189 per night plus taxes. Full breakfast is included.

Training will be held at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center campus.

Use this link to view Project Making Medicine Eligibility

Use this link for the Project Making Medicine Registration Form

Use this link for the Project Making Medicine Registration Requirements

If you are with the Rosebud Sioux PSB Program, please use this link for the application.

Indian Country Child Trauma Center (ICCTC) has adapted four (4) trauma-related treatment protocols, outreach materials, and service delivery guidelines specifically adapted and designed for AI/AN children and their families. The treatment protocols, outreach materials and service delivery guidelines developed by ICCTC incorporates both common and tribal-specific Native cultural perspectives and traditions; focuses on principles of current evidence-based models; and will accommodate the substantial individual-to-individual variability in cultural identity among AI/AN people. For a fee, ICCTC provides training in the different models developed.

Click this link for details of training for a fee.

Closing the gap: How a poor, rural school uses culture to help Native American kids learn, a news article from the Argus Leader about an elementary school on the Rosebud Reservation.

The healing power of heritage, Interventions rooted in Indigenous traditions are helping to prevent suicide and addiction in American Indian and Alaska Native communities.

The hidden health inequalities that American Indian and Alaskan Natives face, the IHS is the primary health care provider for most American Indians. It is responsible for providing health care under historical treaty agreements between the federal government and tribes.

 

National Foster Care Month 2018
"It’s All Relative: Supporting Kinship Connections"

It’s finally here! May is National Foster Care Month (NFCM). To celebrate, the Children’s Bureau—together with its information service, Child Welfare Information Gateway—is providing resources to support and empower kinship caregivers. This year’s theme, “It’s All Relative: Supporting Kinship Connections,” highlights the importance of equipping the professionals supporting kinship and foster parents. The NFCM 2018 website supports this goal by providing free tools and resources to help identify, develop, and support prospective and current foster and kinship families.

How can you get the most out of NFCM 2018?

Learn about the purpose and history of NFCM

1. Access resources for parents, youth, foster parents, relative caregivers, guardians, professionals, tribes, and communities

2. Inspire others with real-life stories—both narratives and videos—showing some of the challenges and successes experienced by families, youth, and professionals

3. Raise awareness by passing along sample email messages, social media posts, and graphics to your friends, family, and colleagues

4. Explore the Community Engagement page to find state kinship and foster care contacts, as well as foster care proclamations and foster care month events

Join the conversation online with the NFCM 2018 Facebook campaign page

Project Making Medicine Resources